9/11 Honor Run 5K, Sept 15, 8:46am, F & M Park, Traverse City

Jen Casey, Race Director, welcomed over 200 runners, a 30% growth over last year, to the second annual edition of the 9/11 Honor Run, held September 15, at F & M Park, in Traverse City. First responders, Fire Department, Police, EMTs who entered the race were the “winners”. They risk their lives every day, so we can live in peace and security.

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The 9/11 run was held to honor those who lost their lives in the September 11th, 2001 terror attacks, as well as Local First Responders and Veterans. Proceeds went to the Grand Traverse Region Public Safety Alliance. This brand new non-profit fund was set up to help Local First Responders (Police, Fire, EMS, Emergency Management, 911 Dispatchers and Coast Guard) which will allow for education opportunities, scholarships, recognition, emergency financial support, etc. All Runners, Walkers, Wheelchairs and dogs were welcome. Results can be found at this link; 9/11 2018 Honor Run

 The race started at 8:46am, which is the same time the World Trade Center North Tower was hit. Entrants gathered before the race for a moving ceremony by the TC Fire Department to remember and honor those who lost their lives that day and show support to our Local First Responders who risk their lives to keep us safe. Then we showed our spirit with an amazing run! TC firefighters Chris Peron, Nate McKerchie and James Smielewski, led the solemn flag ceremony. Ramona Pleva, Doctor of Chiropractic, sang a moving rendition of the “Star Spangled Banner” from a vintage fire truck, in front of a giant flag hanging from a TC Fire Truck. Little Fleet opened early for all race participants, offering a discount off drinks and free soda at the bar to all participants! Live music entertained the crowd. Food trucks, were open early to serve hungry runners. Running Fit of Traverse City gave a $100 Gift Card to the person or company that made the largest donation and a 15% discount to any runner that visited the store with their race bib! Prizes were awarded to the first three age group and overall fastest runners. Runners included several fire department fire fighters wearing complete fire-fighting gear.

Sponsored by Pure Water Works, Munson Medical Center, Michigan Blood, 7/4 UpNorth Live, 94.3 Fox Music Radio, 101.1 Sports Talk Radio, IAF Local 646, Oryana, Alfie Logo Wear, Blarney Stone Broadcasting, Rotary of TC, 106.7 ESPN, 100.3 WQON, 97.5 KLT, Mydogtag.com, and Westwind Construction, over $6,000 was raised for the Grand Traverse Region Public Safety Alliance. Spencer Schmerheim, from 2BaysDJS, was fully equipped with sound gear, providing exciting music.

My “winner” was not the fastest runner in the race, but he was a real “winner” in the race for life. Tim Newdon, 47, is a firefighter with the Metro Fire Department. Tim runs 50-60 miles each week, mainly for stress relief. But Tim has experienced other valuable benefits from running. Before running, his blood pressure was over 170. Now, Tim’s blood pressure is only 110. Tim’s pulse was 88. Now, his pulse is 52. Tim is combating and beating a family history of heart disease. Most male family members died before age 70 from heart conditions. Tim is well on his way to beating those family genes. Congratulations to our “winner”, Tim Newdon. And thank you for your service.

Pat Parker, Chief of the Metro fire Department, ran the 5K race in full firefighter gear. Deepest respect, Pat, for your accomplishment. I have known Pat many years having been a client of his former freight company and serving with Pat on the board of the area Boy Scouts. We are both proud parents of Eagle Scouts. Pat was joined by Nate Saldanra, also of the Metro Fire Department and also in full gear. Jon Williamson, Public Safety Officer in Grayling, also ran in full gear. Jon also runs triathlons and has experience,. He has run his entire life. Thank you for risking your lives to keep us safe. Jacob Steichen, 33, Ken Funk, 34, and Tyler Vandemark, 34, represented the TC Fire Department. Lt Chris Jackson, Jerry Wojtanowski, and Ty Bajtka drove the big firetrucks on display. Nate Mckerchie, was also in the honor guard.  Many more first responders were in the event and many were among the top finishers.

Rhonda Workman, director of the Mesick Mushroom 5K, beat me again across the finish line! Rhonda, I am going to catch you, next time. Rhonda is a veteran. Thank you for your service. She ran today to honor her brother-in-law who was a firefighter. Kristen Moravak ran the 5K to honor her husband, a firefighter for 12 years, who runs but could not attend the race. Kristen was accompanied by her friend, who ran the race, Tom Berg, age 60. Nick Haines, 36, and Kyle Sarber, 29, are with the Peninsula Fire Department. They shared the fact that the entire department is working on a goal of better physical fitness. Shelly Abbring, 62, of TC, ran for her son, Brian, who is in the local Grand Traverse Sherriff Department. Sherry’s cholesterol was as high as 199. Today, with exercise, her cholesterol is down to 146. Her pulse has dropped from 75 to 56. Shelly is a “winner”. Homer Nye and his bride Becky Mang walked the course. More “winners”: Elizabeth Paulson, 77, from Cadillac, runs to see the world. Her friend, Deana Horcher, 58, from Hersey, loves running. Doug Meekhoff, 50, Ray Horton, 25, ran the race and represented sponsor Westwind Construction. Running is their “mental therapy” to help relieve stress.

Volunteers were important to the success of the race. Tony Anderson, helped with late registration. Tony says he is feeling no ill effects from his replaced hip. He has run four marathons this year and is planning his next marathon in Mankato MN, as he approaches running a marathon in every state. Tony is raising funds for Big Brothers, Big Sisters. Find out how you can help at Tony’s website. Congressman Larry Inman helped at registration and passing out water to help honor firefighters. Diane Goss, XC Track coach, and Allison Goss, assistant coach at West Senior High, brought about forty team members to help with the race. The team acted as course marshals and helped with registration. Among the XC team members were Carter Dean, Audrey Braurd, Claire Wells, Abbi Klco, Kate Eveleigh, Abby Hunter, Elliott Smith, and Margret Church.

Jen Casey, Race Director, hopes you will join her for next year’s 9/11 Honor Run. You will enjoy the effort and you will honor the first responders who help make your life safe. Remember to discuss with your doctor before starting an exercise program.

 

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the ice in over 600’ of water in middle of West Bay,,,,,, and saving his dog! He plays blues harmonica globally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need training tips, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Mickey finished first in his age group.  

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Harvest Stompede 5K and 7mi Run, 2018, Sat. Sept 8, Ciccone Vinyards

Race directors, Mario Ciccone and Jamie Dalke, welcomed over 400 runners and walkers to the 18th annual 2018 Harvest Stompede Races. Sponsored by Ciccone Vineyard and other Wine Makers consisting of participant wineries in the Leelanau Wine Trail, the course is open to the public only on race day and takes place through a matrix of beautiful grape-filled vineyard rows and wooded trails in the majestic rolling hills of Leelanau Peninsula. Runners receive a high quality, long sleeved tee-shirt, great snacks, including delicious table grapes, (of course), were available at the end of the race. The course provides landscape views that are unrivaled. Both courses wind through vineyard rows that allow for viewing of nearby participants. Medals go 3 deep in each age group. The race allows the Ciccone’s and others to give back to the Leelanau community. Proceed are donated to non-profit organizations in the Leelanau County area. Results can be found at this link;   Harvest Stompede 2018 Results

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It is a privilege and honor to hear the amazing stories why runners run. It is not my intent to interview the fastest runners, to tell you another story you will soon forget. The intent of these articles is for you to meet people who have changed their lives through running. The Harvest Stompede is a prime example of the life-changing aspect of races, lessons from which we can all learn a valuable life aspect. Mario and Jamie, these interviews will tell you and others of the importance of this race. Thank you for providing us with this vehicle!

As author, I get to pick my “winners”. They may not be the fastest runners, but they are “winners” in the race called “life”. Without a doubt, the “winner” of the 2018 Harvest Stompede is Darcy Dewey, 56, from Grand Haven. Darcy was not the fastest runner, but Darcy is one of the bravest runners. Seven years ago, Darcy’s doctors gave her two years to live. Darcy had contracted a rare form of breast cancer, which did not show up on mammograms until it reached a serious level. Seven years later, Darcy runs marathons. Darcy has a family history of cancer. Many of her family members discovered their individual cancer at about the same time. Remember, this cancer does not show up on the typical mammogram. Darcy’s message to you? “Always get a second opinion. Don’t believe everything the doctors say. I looked around for a doctor until I found one familiar with my type of cancer. This doctor gave me hope“. Darcy is training for the Chicago Marathon where she will join 40,000 other runners. But chances are, Darcy will be the only Chicago Marathon runner who will run the race after returning from a “death sentence”. Congratulations to my most amazing “winner”, Darcy Dewey. Darcy was joined in this race by her husband, Don, 58, Jean Lear, 32, from Denver and Jeff Stewart, 64, from Seattle, who proudly wore his Seattle Marathon Tee shirt. Jeff has run 3 marathons and loves the Leelanau area.

Sarah Carpenter, 42, of Livonia, was a “winner”. We were “winners” because Sarah shared her story with us. Sarah wore a tee-shirt that read in large bold letters, “I FINISNED MY CHEMO”. Sarah learned last May, she had breast cancer. This week, Sarah finished her last chemo. Sarah says; “Running helped me through my chemo”. Sarah’s message to you? “Embrace the suck and take the good when you can”. Sarah met her friends from Ann Arbor while playing ultimate Frisbee. Joining Sarah in the race were Rich Stubbs, 43, of Livonia, Callie Corsa, 34, of Ann Arbor, who is in biomedical research at U of M hospital. Aaron Huba, 39, of Ann Arbor, and Melissa Sterlekar, 39, of South Lyon who is a U of M Nurse and reminds us UM Nurses will be voting on a work stoppage due to lack of a contract. Susan Hund, 57, MaryKay Bickman, 55, and Jenny Moening, 53, all of Rochester, wore matching tee- shirts, while running their 10th annual Harvest Stompede. Jenny tells us that running helped her lose her added baby weight while Susan attributes her 42 count resting heart rate to running. Andrea Burkholder, 40, and Jenny Dallolme of Traverse City, are both moms of three children, both kindergarten teachers and both use running to connect to “who we are”. Running provides stress release and “something special for themselves”. The Stanton family reminded us of the importance of running together as a family. Dad, Doug, Mom, Ann, son, Will and daughter, Katherine, ran the Stompede as a family event. Guess who came in last from this family group. Nice try, Doug!!! Haha! Ann runs with her 4 year old setter, Princess. Jan Zanyk, 61, from Midland and Sarnia, Canada, runs for fitness and mental health. “Running keeps me happy.” Jan was accompanied by her family who ran the race and her two dogs. The brown dog, Scout, (my dog, as a kid, was called “Scout”). Scout is a therapy dog to the other dog, Cooper, when they go to the vet.  Jan’s family, who either ran or watched were, Katie, 28, and Karina, 22, both doctors at UM, GO BLUE!, twin son, Sean, a computer engineer at MSU, (boo!!!),  Austin, 23, an MBA candidate at Northwood College, who coaches and dad David, 61, an IT Executive at Dow in the nature conservancy.

Tom Henderson, and his lovely bride, ran the 7 mile race. Tom remembers running the first Harvest Stompede Race. He was a writer for “Cranes Review”, in Detroit and for the “Michigan Runner Magazine”. That first year, Tom joined 60 other runners in the Harvest Stompede. After publishing his stories about the race, the following year there were 600 runners! Because of the great publicity, the original race director gave Tom a lifetime pass to enter the race. Those were the days, eh, Tom?

The Harvest Stompede could not have been successful without participation of many volunteers who worked registration, course marshals, set-up and clean-up. Angela Richardson-Gross, worked registration as a volunteer. Angela is from the oncology center at Munson Hospital. Daughter, Abigail, worked with her. Sarah Buhl, worked registration.

Mario Ciconne told us about the origins of the race. Mario’s dad, Tony, was an avid runner. Tony ran most of his life. Nate Rouse, an early employee of Tony, was an early race director. Mario took over for him. Jamie Dalke will take over for Mario. Jamie, by the way, is no slouch to running having completed two ultra-marathons and numerous shorter races.

Mario Ciccone and Jamie Dalke, invite you to attend next year’s Harvest Stompede Races. You will enjoy the beauty of the unique, grape-filled, vineyard course, the long sleeved tee-shirt and the great snacks. Maybe your story will be told in next year’s article. Always ask your doctor for permission to exercise.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the ice in over 600’ of water in middle of West Bay,,,,,, and saving his dog! He plays blues harmonica globally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need training tips, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Mickey finished first in his age group.  

Dune Dash 4Mi Run, Aug 18, 2018, Sand Dunes Climbing Hill, Glen Eden

Race director Matthew Ross and #1 volunteer, his wife, Jennifer, welcomed runners and walkers to the 7th annual Dune Dash, four mile run-walk, August 18, 2018, at the foot of the beautiful Sleeping Bear Climbing Hill. The race course showcases the Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail located in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. Starting and finishing at the base of the Dune Climb, runners follow the paved Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail past rolling dunes and beautiful forests to the turn-around point at historic Glen Haven garages, garages I almost burned down. (As a dunes driver, one summer, I slept above those garages in Glen Eden, and almost burned them down when my electric blanket caught fire).

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All proceeds from this event went to the continued construction and maintenance of Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail. Unique carved awards were presented to the overall male and female finisher, and the top three finishers in each age-group. All entrants received a souvenir tee shirt and excellent post-race snacks. Special thanks to race director Matt Ross, who directed the event even though he was recovering from a still-painful, recent serious accident. Matt would not let the injury come between him and his beloved race.

The race was sponsored by Williams Honda, Tart Trails, Meijer, The Filling Station, and Pure Water Works. KLT Radio, was represented by their colorful broadcasting trailer, a prize-filled roulette game and Krista Gothard, Jason Gothard, Shelly Grant and Jim Smith. Trevor Step, owner of RF Timing and Brian Marhofer, who lives in TC, were present with their computers to score the event. The results were ready in a timely, legible fashion and can be found at; Dune Dash 2018 Results

And the race “winner”? He did not enter the race, but Tom Van Pelt, of Northport, was the clear race “winner”. Tom brought his restored 1956 Oldsmobile, #8 Dunes mobile to display at the event. The car is an amazing duplicate of the car I drove as a Dunes Driver during my college years. Beautiful Red and white, with its’ own stuffed sleeping bear complete with cubs, the car has only 60,000 miles. Decades ago, Tom saw the car for sale and asked his dad to buy it. At the time, Tom did not know the price. He wanted the car. It was purchased from Chet Swanson Olds for an unheard of price. It’s worth a few more bucks, today. Thank you, Tom for bringing your beauty to the 2018 Dune Dash.

Jerry Peterson represented The Friends of the Sleeping Bear Trail. The group maintains the trails, clearing, mowing, repairing, and removing down trees. Jerry graduated from University of Michigan, (GO BLUE), was a Ford executive, and upon retirement from Ford, taught for 14 years at UM business school (my alumni school)!

More “winners” follow; everyone in the event was a “winner” but these “winners” excelled; Matt Tiberg, 39 from TC lost weight and runs because it feels good. Judging from the smile on his face as he crossed the finish line, I’d day Matt had a good time. Matt was joined by he wife, Heidi, who finished along with Matt. Matt is the son of Michael Tiberg, who I used to race with. Mike and I were always dead even at the start, but somewhere along the way, Michael pulled ahead and beat me. Michael has completed seven Boston Marathons. We were fortunate to meet the Johnson Family, of Muskegon, who run/walk as a family. Tammy Johnson, 43, runs to stay in shape to keep up with her son, Trenton, 8, who also plays hockey. Cindy, 58, walks the course to keep physically fit with her family. Dad, Dan, 38, is Trevor’s hockey coach.

Rhonda Workman, 63, director of the Mesick Mushroom Festival 5K, and veteran (thank you, for your service) beat me handily. Next time, I will catch you, Rhonda. Mike Herron, 68, of TC, runs to keep the weight off. Dave Jousma, 55, of Grand Rapids, lost 60#. For him, running is a healthy habit. Dave’s wife, Melisa, 53, runs “To get out of my head”. Many of us could use “getting out of our heads”. Mark Hammerberg, 60, of Beulah, runs “to maintain his weight and his sanity”. Eric Suehrstedt, age 60, from Maine, proudly wore his Beach to Beacon 10K tee shirt. He ran the race in Cape Elizabeth, ME. The race is sponsored, in part, by Joan Benoit Samuelson, the famous women’s marathon record holder.  Eric’s wife, Wendy, ran today. She met and became friends with “Joanie” through her firm’s sponsorship of the 10K. “Joanie is a wonderful person and was kind enough to send me congratulations after I ran my first marathon”. Nice friend!!! Lorelie Suehrstedt, 49, Bay Village, Ohio, (Near Cleveland) “started running when I was 42 because I hated it. I wanted to teach my children that hate can be turned into love. And when you turn hate into love, you can do anything”. Wise words to live by. Her husband, Craig, 47, says “running has turned into a family event, with fun adventures and lots of travel around the USA and even many foreign lands. We’ve been to Yellowstone and Glacier National Monument. We have met many wonderful people because of running”. Danny Zolik, 71, ran last year, but walked the course, this year with his two year old grandson, Theo. Danny says “Walking keeps me looking forward.”

The race was conducted with the help of many volunteers. Julie Alton, registered runners and passed out unique tee shirts. Allen Olander, worked with the friends of sleeping bear and helped marshal the course on his bike. He took bottles of water to several struggling participants, thereby avoiding a possible serious incident.

Matthew and Jennifer Ross hope to see you at next year’s Dune Dash. You will enjoy the beauty of the course and the unique awards. And the Ross’s welcome you to the scary Zombie Run, 5K, held October 27, at Right Brain Brewery on 16th Street in TC. Remember to ask your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.  Yes, he was a Dunes mobile driver!!

Five of the Best Mickey Fivenson Commercials from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s

From the 1970s to the 1990s, Mickey Fivenson was a force in Northern Michigan television advertising. In his ads, Mickey acted, fought, sung, and announced, alongside Ron Lundmark, who played a variety of characters, most notably Sven The Swedish Chef. It was Sven who coined the commercials’ catch phase, “Thank you, Mickey.”

What was unique about Mickey’s commercials was that while 98% of the viewers were not potential clients, the remaining 2% were. If you were a restaurant, bar, hotel, hospital, nursing home or school, you came to Mickey.

In the commercials, Mickey was shown popping out of food mixers, pounding nails with a cup, breaking old toasters, in his running gear or playing blues harmonica; The spots were so unique that the Television Bureau of Advertising created a training video of Mickey and his spots for national B2B advertisers.

Below are five select commercials from a recently recovered trove of Fivenson Food Equipment commercials. You’ll need to click play, wait a moment, then click play again to watch them.

1. The earliest commercial recovered. This was before the commercials featured the tag line, and before Ron appeared as The Swedish Chef.

 

2. Mickey wore his running gear for this early commercial. Still no “thank you, Mickey” or Ron. The commercial begins after a few second of blank screen, and audio quality is low.

 

3. In this Western-themed commercial, Mickey and Ron debate the merits of commercial ice makers. Ron’s cowboy character was an early experiment–the first of many–that would lead to the creation of the Swedish Chef character.

 

4. This commercial includes the first known reference of the trademark tag line “thank you, Mickey!”

 

5. Mickey always enjoyed turning the spotlight on others, and he did just that in a series of later commercials featuring customers in his show room.

Alden Run, 5K, 10K and Fun Run, 2018, Downtown Alden

Race director, Steve Kershner welcomed over 400 runners and walkers to one of the oldest runs in Northern Michigan, The Alden Run, 5K, 10K and Fun Run, 2018, with start and finish in downtown Alden. The course is on paved and dirt roads. Results can be found at this link; Alden Run Results .

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Overall awards were presented in ten year age groups for the 5K and 10K through age 70+ for both men and women. Race winners received gorgeous home-made plaques cut from a log. Proceeds from the run go toward beautification and improvement projects in the Alden community and to the Bellaire and Mancelona High School Cross Country teams. Sponsors of the race were merchants of downtown Alden who contributed unique door prizes.

My “winner”? Hands down, it was the husband-wife team of E. Wright Davis and his wife, Cindy. E. Wright, a retired attorney from Georgia and Memphis, walked the 2 mile fun run with two replaced hips caused by an auto accident. He walks most days, usually pain free. He also swims 12 laps 3-4 times each week. He is meds free! Congrats to E. Wright. Wife Cindy is no slouch. Cindy lost 85 pounds in about one year. Cindy had been diagnosed as pre-diabetic with high cholesterol and a high A1C test. Now her blood measurements are normal. She is totally free of meds. Their friend, Marcia Wiinamaki, ran the 5K. Marcia runs for the sense of accomplishment and to relieve stress. Their “leader”, I call her a leader because we ran together for about 1 mile, then she took-off and left me “sucking wind”, Mary Beth Good, 61, from Berrien Springs, runs for her sanity. Mary Beth started training with a friend for a marathon and never looked back. Now she needs to run. I will catch you next time, Mary Beth.

We have another “winner”, (of course all 400+ runners are winners), but Steph Lockman, 46 deserves special attention. Steph weighed 333 pounds before she started losing weight with yoga. Today, she weighs a svelte 175 pounds. Steph lost 158 pounds! Amazing. Because of her incredible weight loss, we are awarding her the title of “Big Loser” for the 2018 Alden Run. Steph has continued her exercise program 570+ consecutive days.  The “winners” keep coming. Theresa Hubbard 61, of Dewitt, was diagnosed with full blown diabetes and hypertension. She had an A1C of 8.2! Today, her A1C is a remarkably normal 5.5. Her goal is to get off all meds. She lost 20 pounds in the last 2 months. Rick Anderson, 71, of Rapid City, was pre-diabetic. No More! Through diet and daily exercise, Rick has brought his potential diabetes under control. Beth Dole, 50, of TC, runs to improve her lung capacity, for weight loss, and better endurance. Steve Shuster, and wife Beth, (58 and 57) moved to the Alden area from Brighten in October of 2017. They run to meet friendly people. Steve and Beth lose about 10 pounds every time they train for a ½ marathon.

Mike Wise, 65, of Parma, runs to stay in shape for backpacking trips he leads for the Sierra Club. Mike has taken hiking trips to the Grand Canyon, Utah, and California. Recently, Mike hurt his knee stepping off a stool, but is returning to good condition. His friend, Eileen Johnson, 61, of Battle Creek, runs for strength and because it makes her feel good. Her mother was a diabetic, with high blood pressure, Eileen runs to avoid both diabetes and the high blood pressure in her family. Looking at Eileen, one could say she has successfully beat questionable family genes. Maggie Wise, Mike’s daughter, is 23, also from Parma. Maggie runs because running improves mood, she feels good and for overall strength. For Bill Swift, The Alden Run is his 1078th race. Bill’s goal is to hit number 1200, then what? He will continue running. Twenty years ago, Bill was in a “danger zone” for high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Now, his blood measurements are normal. Bill wrestled at 133 pounds in high school and ran the 440 yard “dash”. So, Bill’s exercise pedigree runs high. Bill says to new runners “Make it fun. Enjoy all runs. Don’t over-do exercise or you could suffer injury.  Support area races“. Wise words from experience. Barbara Klingenmaier, 70, from Muskegon, runs for mental health first and fitness second. Barbara has been running since 1975. “Running kept me sane while working in child welfare, supervising in child protective services the last twenty years.” Roy Winegar, 69, of Muskegon, often wears thumb braces due to arthritis. Shaking hands hurts him. He runs to avoid meds. Kent Walker, 77, of Alden and Baltimore, beat me in our age group. Kent was a high school track coach for 37 years. He trained with his cross country teams. He began to train for marathons. 30 marathons later, he can claim several nationally famous runs including the Pikes Peak Marathon, the Marine Corps Marathon (I ran the Marine Corps Marathon) the JFK 50 miler, which he ran twice and he ran around Torch Lake, 42 miles in 1980. His “Run around Torch” was covered in area newspapers.

The Alden Run could not have been so nicely conducted without a great crew of volunteers and course marshals. Diane Verploegh, is in charge of all volunteers. She worked in registration and was always available to answer volunteer questions. John Wethy, has volunteered over 20 years. He owned Higgins Store, the former start site. John started the tradition of giving free ice cream to the runners. John was helping in registration. He was ably assisted by Suzanne Walker who is also a 20 year volunteer. Chris and Emma Clore, were selling Alden Run tee shirts from prior years. They were having great success. Marion Johnson and Sandy Bodenbender were in charge of the Torch Area Artisans Guild (TAAG) quilt sale. What a lovely bunch of quilts including the drawing prize quilt. But the quilt that attracted my attention was a unique multi-colored quilt handcrafted by Carolyn Nowfel called “Grandmother’s Dream”, in honor of Carolyn’s grandmother who was alive when Carolyn started the quilt. The quilt could be had for only $135, which Carolyn said “the amount hardly covers materials”. What a beautiful quilt!!

Race Director, Steve Kershner hopes to see you at next year’s Alden Run. You will love the camaraderie and the challenge. Ask your doctor for permission before starting an exercise program, and as Bill Swift says “Make it fun!”

 

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.  

Chemical Bank Kingsley Heritage Days 5K & Fun Run. July 21, 2018. Brownson Park, Kingsley

The Stark family really knows how to put on terrific race. Chris and Jessica Stark, directed the Chemical Bank Kingsley Heritage Days 5K & Fun Run. July 21, Brownson Park, Kingsley, a race that meanders along homey Kingsley streets and lovely wooded trails, awards many medals, provides great food and gives quick results.

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This year, the race was timed by RF Timing. Jessica said they were a great addition, providing fast, accurate results which can be found at this link; Kingsley Heritage 5K 2018 Results . We saw another side of Chris Stark. Normally, he goes about his business of quietly finishing high in area races. Today, he was the clever race announcer. He was funny, accurate and concise. Maybe Chris should announce other races?? We aren’t done with the Stark family. Son, Eric, ran a fast 22 minute 5K, and daughter Madilyn was looking cute in her stroller. Other daughter Allison, 5 years old, came out and ran a 8 minute mile fun run! Did I say Chris ran the 5K course four times, the day before the race to be sure the route was in order? He did!!! Today, I beat him across the line, but he started dead last and encouraged and chatted with other runners,,,, and it was his second time running the course. All’s fair in love and war,,,,,,, I beat Chris Stark across the line.

Did I tell you there was a delicious, FREE BREAKFAST FOR 5K PARTICIPANTS AT THE ROCK FOLLOWING THE RACE!!! Oh, boy,,,  good. And the food provided at the end of the race was terrific. There was GOGO apple sauce and yogurt, with sampling by Amy Fritz, who is also the director of the Blue Ribbon 5K for prostate cancer, held September 29, at the old depot , currently The Filling Station. Amy works for Byte Productions and doubles as a GOGO representative. She also helps conduct the huge Turkey Trot. Did you know the founder of GOGO, which is distributed around the world, went to NMC and lives in Traverse City? Main sponsor for the 5K was Chemical Bank. More sponsors were A. Papano’s Pizza, Northland Food Center, GOGO Squeeze, The Rock, The Lighthouse Neurological Rehab Center, J&S Hamburg on S. Airport, Classic Motor Sports, Whirly’s Coffee & Cream and Running Fit.

Every finisher was a “winner”, but there were a few special folks you should meet. My first “winner” wasn’t even in the race. Tom Wollam, 69, from Kingsley, accompanied his son, Toby, who ran the 5K. Tom is cousin to my high school classmate, Joe Wollam, from the Central Class of 1960. Tom deserves to be a “winner” because he walks up to 20 miles most days for good health and to relieve anxiety. He can’t run because of a replaced knee. Tom also recovered from prostate cancer. Tom, you are a terrific example of why folks should exercise. You are a “winner” in my book.

Let’s share more “winners” with you. Bill Swift, 75, from TC, won a medal and finished his 1076th race! Congrats, Bill. Jennica Graham, 36, from Cedar, runs for relaxation. Her parents, Steve and Kathy VanHouton, came up from Grand Rapids to cheer her on and to assist Jennica’s son, Gavin, 5, who completed his first fun run. Kim Silbor, 40, of TC, runs for health. Nick Amato, 21, of Suttons Bay and Ann Arbor, is taking the grad school GRE test to try to qualify for entry to the University of Michigan Graduate Business School (my alma mater) and earn a double Masters in HMP. GO BLUE!!! Nick is a member of the UM triathlete team. Did I say today, Nick was over-all fastest runner and took the grand prize? And then there is the sad story of Alan Heidt, 61, of TC. Alan is a registered respiration therapist and recommends exercise to most of his clients. He specializes in obstructive sleep apnea and works at Munson Home Medical Care. We see Alan at many of the area races. As a medical professional, Alan knows what is best for general good health. Today, Alan was a big loser. Chris Stark drew Alan’s name for a free pair of running shoes donated by Running Fit. But Alan had already left. And the rules of the games said you had to be present, to win. Sorry Alan, you lost this one, but you are a winner is our book. Ella Thomas, 13, of TC was accompanied to the race by her dad Brant.  Allan Cleland, must have won a medal. Allan is only 88 years old, by far, the oldest runner/walker in the event. Allan says his blood pressure is greatly reduced by exercise. After exercise, his blood pressure is a terrific 125 over 75. Mark and Rebecca Nofke, 35 of Kingsley, participated, Mark behind the stroller pushing Brynn, 1, and aiding with Brady, 5. Rebecca placed high in her age group. Rebecca was featured on the website of the 2017 race and was featured, with Brynn, in my article “Peas in a Pod” about the benefits of running while pregnant. Amanda Smanzer, 29, of TC was accompanied by Anna Martin, 28, of Kingsley, during the race. Amanda says “Running makes me feel like a kid, again.” Anna runs for the benefit of the Hope Water Project. She runs with her nine year old pit bull, Akani. Adam Downey, 36, and Jody Kopa Brighton of Fife Lake, ran in memory of their friend Larry White, who recently passed away. We were honored to meet special runner/wheeler, Rick, 59, a client at the Lighthouse (HIPPA rules forbid the use of Rick’s last name). Rick was in a motorcycle accident that caused brain damage and his left leg short. Today, Rick was a winner. Keith Stutzman, 62, from Manton, runs because he wants to play with his grandkids. Keith ran a 21 minute 5K and was a winner today. He qualified for and completed the Boston Marathon in a respectable time.

The race could not have succeeded without the help of many volunteers in registration and course marshaling.  Stephanie Lathrop, was a volunteer in registration as was Jeanine Elder. You guys made the race a fine experience for the runners and sponsors.

Jessica and Chris, Eric, Allison, and Madilyn Stark hope you’ll join them to experience true race hospitality at next year’s Chemical Bank Kingsley Heritage Days 5K and Fun Run. Enjoy the lovely course, the free breakfast and enjoy the medals. But remember to ask your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished first in his age group.  

“Thank you, Mickey!” The “truth” about Mickey’s TV ads

“Thank you, Mickey!”. Mickey Fivenson, owner of Fivenson Food Equipment, was one of the pioneers of Northern Michigan business-to-business (B2B) television advertising. As an on-air personality, Mickey sold food equipment to restaurants, bars, hotels, schools, hospitals and nursing homes throughout Northern Michigan. Mickey became a household word with his unique TV spots. You never knew what you’d see next; Mickey as a long-distance runner, Mickey popping out of a food mixer or out of a steamtable, Mickey pounding a nail with a cup, or Mickey playing blues harmonica. It did not matter if you were in the food business or not, you knew Mickey.

His spots played at any time of the day, on soap operas, during the evening news, in the World Series, you never knew when you would see a Mickey Fivenson commercial. And you were entertained by the clever ads. The phrase, delivered by the Sven, the Swedish Chef, “Thank you, Mickey” became Mickey’s trademark. His TV spots covered the entire Northern half of the lower peninsula of Michigan and much of the UP. The ads were written, produced, engineered and written by Ron Lundmark, who appears on screen with Mickey as the Swedish Chef.

Mickey’s ads were featured on a national training video for the Television Broadcasters of America because of his unique B2B approach. Due to the nature of the media, most viewers were home owners, but if you needed food equipment and you were watching TV, you thought of Mickey. The ads were often co-sponsored by major food equipment manufacturers.

Mickey is unique in the food service arena. Mickey became a mentor to other businesses considering B2B TV marketing. Today, you won’t see Mickey’s spots on TV, but folks seem to have never forget “Thank you, Mickey”. I know, because to this day, 25 years after my last spot on TV, seldom does a week goes by that I do not hear the phrase, “Thank you, Mickey”.

Here’s a sample, more coming soon!

 

National Cherry Festival Meijer Festival of Races, July 7, 2018

The National Cherry Festival Meijer Festival of Races, 5K, 10K, 15K and Half Marathon was held July 7, 2018. Race director, Katherine Brege, welcomed about 3,000 runners to the races. Over 2,000 signed up for the 5K! Results can be found at this link; Meijer NCF Race results  .The races started on the Northwestern Michigan Campus and finished downtown at Front Street and Union Street. Runners experienced finishing the last three blocks of their race in front of the crowd waiting for the Grand Festival Parade. Runners enjoyed the picturesque views of Grand Traverse Bay. Runners came to the final stretch downtown and were re-energized by thousands of cheering fans all the way to the finish line.

 

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Sponsored by Meijer Stores, the race was also sponsored by Cherry Bay Orchards. Denis Bouchard, from Cherry Bay Orchards passed out samples of dried cherrys and cherry drinks. Denis was assisted by Joe, Kristen and Stephanie. Chateau Grand Traverse, was a sponsor. They provided a free glass of wine to runners of proper age. Priority Health, Up North Live, Radio Z-93, and the Traverse City Record Eagle were important sponsors. At the finish, runners were treated to fresh cherries, cherry drink and GoGo Squeeze, all natural applesauce in various fruit flavors in an individual dispenser. GoGo Applesauce was created by a former NMC student.

Let’s get right to the “winners”. These competitors may not have been the fastest runners, but they typify the values of running, the important way running has changed their lives.

My first place “winner” is Peter Baty, 50, of Burlingame, California. Peter ran the 10K. He did not win a medal, but Peter typifies the importance of running. Peter runs for physical and mental health. Peter is also the son of my best buddy growing up in Traverse City. Peter’s dad, Donnie, was my “best buddy” until we were about 10 years old and he moved to Hastings. We celebrated ouf birthdays together as toddlers. I has not seen Donnie in over 60 years. What a shock to meet and interview Donnie’s son. Donnie went on the play football for the University of Michigan, GO BLUE. Peter’s mom, is the former Lou Ellen Benson who was a National Cherry Queen. Lou Ellen graduated a year behind me at Central High. I and my sons, Zack, from Vancouver, and Adam, from Washington D.C. who ran with me in the 10K. We encountered Peter several times during the event. Peter was accompanied by his friend, Jacob Schaaf, 37, of San Francisco, California. Jacob runs for cycling conditioning and because running is fun as a team building event.

My next “winner” is Kelly France, 38. Kelly moved to Traverse City from Muskegon one year ago. Welcome to Traverse City, Kelly. Kelly works in the mental health field as a counselor and therapist. She works in substance abuse online for a health care organization in Muskegon and travels monthly to Muskegon. Kelly recommends running and other physical exercise for all her clients for self-care and for better mental health. Kelly says; “Physical health and well-being is critical for a healthy brain and mind”. Wise words to heed. And the “winner” keep coming. Another “winner” is Bill Ruesink, 74, of Williamsburg and Springfield, IL. Bill is 6” tall and weighs 151 pounds, the same weight as in high school. Bill ran a great race, last year. In June of 2017, Bill received a pacemaker due to a heart blockage and a heartbeat that was missing for up to 15 seconds at a time. With no family history of heart conditions, Bill’s heart was failing. As a trained endurance athlete, Bill’s resting pulse had been a healthy 45. Bill received a pacemaker because his pulse dropped dangerously low and he had blockages. The doctors set his new heart beat to 60. 60 was too high for a trained athlete. Bill became dizzy. The doctors lowered the pacemaker heart beat to 50. Bill feels much better with a pulse of 50. Bill plans to continue running like he did today in the 5K. We were happy to see Roger Mulder, 78, from Holland, who I interviewed at length last year’s race. Roger had not seen last year’s article. My son, who is a technical computer whiz, found the article on his phone, showed the article to Roger and emailed him the link. Thanks, Adam!

Gary Lake, 72, of Honor, was a volunteer handing out ½ marathon shirts. He is the famous Bayer Aspirin Marathon Man. Gary survived a heart attack and continued running marathons because he took Bayer Aspirin. Gary was featured on a national TV spot for Bayer promoting the importance of Bayer Aspirin. Gary has completed 51 marathons including several Boston’s. He was entered in the Boston Marathon two years ago during the infamous bombing. Gary tells the story of how he reached mile 25, when race officials directed runners off the course telling all participants there had been an “incident” near the finish line, so he could not complete the marathon. Only later did Gary learn about the bombing. He was lucky to not have been personally involved in the tragedy. For several years, Gary was in charge of water stations and water station volunteers for the Detroit Free Press Marathon. Gary was responsible for over 550 volunteers. Gary wrote a multi-page water station manual which is still used by the Free Press Marathon. The manual is used here in Traverse City at the Meijer Festival of Races. The water stations at this race are excellent, I can personally attest. There were many volunteers and the cups were large enough to get a good drink. Thank you, Bayer Aspirin Marathon man!

Bill Neason, 71, of TC, ran the ½ marathon. Bill is a 1965 graduate of Central High School. Bill runs for overall health. Bill’s advice; “Keep moving or lose it”. Matt Peppes, 34, from Kansas City, is the owner of a digital marketing firm. He runs for stress release. Owning a digital marketing firm can be the source of plenty of stress. Lauren Nugent, 33, from Kansas City, runs for better health. Jim Monroe, 70, of TC, has run since high school. He runs 3 times per week to stay in shape for cross country skiing. Jim runs with the Traverse City Track Club in their weekly runs regardless of the weather. Linda Ramsey, 56, from Benzonia, runs to stay fit and meet people. Tim Asper, a “miracle man” for surviving a near fatal motorcycle accident, completed the race smiling. We would be remiss if we did not mention one of the favorite entries in the 5K, Grant Forrester and his team of happy helpers. Grant, though partially paralyzed, completed the 5K race.

Volunteers were crucial to the success of event. In addition to the many course marshals and water station workers, Nicole Wagner and Heather Feriend worked the registration tables as a mother-daughter team.  Sue Leach worked at registration as did Leonard Chown and Nichole Irish. Thank you to all volunteers.

Race director, Katherine Brege, hope you will enter next year’s National Cherry Festival Meijer Festival of Races, 5K, 10K, 15K and Half Marathon. You will feel better for the effort. If you can’t join them for this race, you can enter the Leapin’ Leprechaun Race held in March. Remember to ask your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.  

Goodwill Industries of Northern Michigan 5K Run for Shelter, June 23, Willow Hill School, Traverse City

Goodwill Industries of Northern Michigan 5K Run for Shelter, was held Saturday, June 23, at Willow Hill School, Traverse City. Fund Development Specialist and Race director, Stephanie Rustem, reports 171runners, walkers, babies and innumerable pets registered for the annual race. The registration fee supports one night of shelter for a neighbor in need, which includes two meals, basic necessities and resources to secure jobs and permanent housing. Participants received a Run for Shelter t-shirt, immediate race results and snacks following the completion of the run. Participants also walked away with the pleasure of supporting a good cause and knowing they made a difference in the lives of our neighbors experiencing homelessness. The race was run on a course through lovely neighborhoods, along West Bay, and through the flatlands of Hickory Hills finishing at Willow Hill School. Race results can be found at this link;    Goodwill 5K Results .   In addition to the well-known Goodwill area stores, the organization provides needed housing, merchandise, job help, and social support to Northern Michigan clients.

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Goodwill deeply appreciates the following sponsors; Presenting Sponsor, American Proficiency Institute. Platinum Sponsor, Bill Marsh Group. Silver Sponsors, Alfie Logo Gear, Family Fare Markets, Yen Yoga & Fitness. In Kind Sponsor, Oryana. Media Sponsors; Record Eagle, Fox 32, 9 & 10 News. With the help of these important sponsors, the race was a critically needed success for Goodwill of Northern Michigan.

Let’s get right to my winner. He was not the fastest runner, but Dave Schupbach, age 77, of Jackson, is an excellent example of the benefits to aging runners,,,,,,,, such as me. Dave was running in his 900th race including 160 triathlons. At one time, Dave was ranked 6th in the nation in his age group. Most important, Dave has beaten genetics. Dave’s dad had bypass surgery in 1963 at age 60. He passed away at age 74. Dave is in excellent health. He has no illnesses. His blood pressure has dropped from 160 to about 110. He lost 20 pounds. He weighs less now than he did in high school. It was a pleasure for me to run some of the early parts of this race with Dave, until he took off on me. Congratulations to my race winner, Dave Schupbach. Dave, you are a winner in the game we call “Life” and an example to everyone.

Bill Marsh Jr, 57, ran the 5K. Bill and his brother, Jamie, sponsored the race because “Goodwill fulfills a vital role in meeting homeless needs beginning with shelter.” Bill has been an enthusiastic runner for many years. “Running has been part of my lifestyle,” Bill adds. Bill and Jamie took a high position in their age group. Thanks to Bill Marsh Jr, and all the sponsors. Jen Casey, 40, of TC, is director of the 9-11 Honor 5K Run, held Saturday, Sept 15, at F & M Park, in Traverse City. Jen ran with Branden, 1½ years old and Harper, 6½  months in a unique racing stroller for two children. Jen runs “to be a good example for her kids”. Anne Stanton, 60, of TC, runs for bone health, to be outside, and to be among friends. Homer Nye, 73, of TC, walked the course with his wife, Becky Mang. Homer says, “We have to work with the homeless.” Homer adds, “Walking has helped me age with more grace by keeping me fit, lowering my cholesterol, but most of all, it’s fun.” Becky adds, “The event helps raise funds for the homeless.  And walking is very beneficial for moving into the next stage of life.” Jessie Hernden, 30, from TC, runs to explore the city and to exercise her pet dogs. Jeff Houser, 33, of TC is a member of the Traverse City Track Club and proudly wears a TCTC team shirt. Jeff won overall second place, today. He runs so he can eat anything and drink anything.

The race would not be successful for the many Goodwill representatives present at the event and welcoming all participants. Sue Vado is Goodwill Volunteer Manager and Manager of Workers-On-Wheels. Sue has been a Goodwill manager over two years. Sue seemed to be everywhere, making participants feel welcome and comfortable. Sarah Dell’Acqua Kime, is Director of Advancement. Sue’s dad, Dick and I were runners together in the “early days” of running. Dick used to beat me hands down in races. He was FAST. Today, Dick has experienced back surgeries and has stenosis and cannot run. So I finally beat you, eh, Dick? Seriously, I hope for your full recovery so you can beat me again. Ryan Hannon is the Street Outreach Coordinator. Ryan works with homeless youth. He brings resources directly to the location of the client. Robert Randall, 53, of TC, ran the 5K and is Director of Donated Goods. He oversees the Northern Michigan stores. Running helps him control his weight and retain his fitness level. And there were important volunteers. Without them, the race could not happen. Volunteers were in charge of registration and were critical course marshals.

Race Director, Stephanie Rustem, and the many Goodwill employees and volunteers, want to see you at next year’s event. You will feel better for your effort because you will be supporting an important local organization with a great cause and you will be supporting your own fitness. Talk to your doctor before starting a fitness program. See you next year at the race.

FivensonYour author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished fourth in his age group.  

North Mitten 5K, 10K and ½ Marathon, Crystal Mountain, May 27, 2018

Race director, Janice Davidson, and Crystal Mountain’s amazing PR director, Brian Lawson, who announced the awards, welcomed 391 runners and walkers to the 5th annual North Mitten 5K, 10K and ½ Marathon, Crystal Mountain, May 27. Race results can be found at this link; North Mitten Results . Runners kicked off Summer with a running start at Crystal Mountain’s 5th Annual Half Marathon, 10k, and 5k race! The North Mitten Half Marathon, 10k and 5k is a combination of paved roads, dirt roads and trails. The North Mitten routes consist of primarily flat, open trails on Crystal Mountain property and did not climb the mountain. Races started and finished at the white slopeside tent near the Crystal Clipper chairlift. This was a great spring race for beginners and experienced runners! Top three racers in each category won a prize pack.  An award ceremony was held at the Start/Finish Tent at 10:30am. Race results were posted and updated at the Start/Finish Tent. Participants received free admission to Micros at MountainTop. Plus all entrants were entered to win prizes including a resort stay. Volunteers were used for aid stations, course marshal, registration, start/finish line and course sweeps. All volunteers and runners received a tee shirt and one beverage at Micros at MountainTop.

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Who was a “winner”? They were not the fastest runners, but Rod and Barbara Michaelson, 70, from Traverse City, were the runners who exemplified why exercise is important to good health. Ron runs and works out so he can “Stay off the couch”. Exercise works. Barbara has an even more critical reason for her exercise. Barbara suffers from rheumatoid arthritis. Exercise keeps her joints flexible and loose and exercise helps relieve pain. Exercise has helped Barbara reduce her medication and gives the Michaelson’s an excuse to spent valuable time together as a family event. The Michaelson’s also work out at a local gym and were wearing matching tee shirts advertising the gym. Congratulations to my “winners”, Rod and Barbara Michaelson. May you continue to enjoy exercise and the positive benefits?

Another “winner” was Jill Murphy, 49, from TC. I ran with Jill starting around mile five when she graciously offered me water. This race was Jill’s first 10K. Jill was running in honor of her son, Seth Beaudry, age 19. Several months ago, Seth was in a serious car accident and became paralyzed from the waist down. He avoided serious upper body injuries because at the last moment, he turned his head away from the impact. Seth is taking rehab, and hopes to walk again, but the road to walking is far away and fraught with many perils. Jill says; “Thanks to God that Seth is alive.” Seth was a runner. He hopes to eventually regain his running skills. Jill, congratulations. You “won” your first 10K. How many of you can say you won your first race?

We met more “winners”. It is amazing how exercise has changed their lives. John Germaine, 59, from Northville, ran the 10K. John runs to stay healthy. His father and grandfather were both sedentary and died from heart conditions. John’s resting heart rate is down 16 beats. John also runs with his wife and daughters.  Wife, Darlene, 60, (running helps her tennis) and sister, Cindy Rebman, (a lawyer in insurance defense) run for their brother, Carl Rebman, a disabled vet, who can’t run.  Daughter, Germain, 27 and her fiancé, Tyler Allen, 26, joined the family event.

Becky Young, 66, from Hastings, is a 3x marathoner with a 4;04 PR at the Chicago Marathon. What is amazing about Becky is that she is running on a replaced knee, with Doctor’s permission. Becky has lower pulse and enjoys running with her dogs. She stayed at Crystal Mountain, proving the economic benefit of races. Becky’s sister, Judy Young, 64, of San Carlos, CA, says running helps her avoid weight gain, and keeps her and her sister looking young. I agree!!!!

Our favorite University of Michigan runner was Bill Donoghue, 44, from Chicago. Bill sported a UM shirt that screamed GO BLUE and a low pulse of 42! Bill’s undergrad degree is from, where else, UM, and his law degree is from Georgetown, where my son, Adam received his master’s degree in foreign affairs. Bill was accompanied by the Donoghue clan, Ruth, 10, Charlie, 12 and Clark, 8. Did I say, GO BLUE? Vince Holmes, 56, from Davison, runs for stress release. Jeffery Hirsh, 42, is from TC and runs because he loves it. Bill Marshall, 78, from Benzonia, beat me like a drum in our age group for the 10K. But it should be no surprise he beat me.  Bill is a national champion tri-athlete, and still holds the Benzie school 440 record. He was a world champion at the young age of 71! Eric Buth, 55, of Ada, ran the ½ Marathon. Eric runs for mental health and for fitness. Eric should know what is good for him. He is an oncologist, and takes no stress meds. Running is his cure. Stacy Farmer, 46, from Frankfort, suffers from scoliosis in her back. Running relieves her pain. Stacy has run marathons. Stacy was running for her friend, Shelly Waldred, 48, who missed the race because she was flying in too late, from Spain. Sounds like a good excuse. Katherine Seekamp, 23, from Interlochen, coached West Middle School XC team. Katherine’s brother, Jimmy, graduated from UM with a degree in nuclear engineering. He will be earning his grad degree as a medical assistant. Dorothy Jaquish, 38, of Interlochen, lost 45 pounds and is losing even more. Dorothy plans to run a 5K every month. Kathleen Piatt, 66, from Montecillo, IL, was on her county board. Kathleen runs because it “keeps me trim”. She coached XC at middle school and started “Girls on the Run” in her community.

Janice Davidson and Brian Lawson invite you to Crystal Mountain next year for the North Mitten Races. You will enjoy a pristine course through the woods and maybe you will win a kayak, but you will be a “winner” for trying. Remember to ask your doctor before starting any exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 marathon PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba diver and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.