“Thank you, Mickey!” The “truth” about Mickey’s TV ads

“Thank you, Mickey!”. Mickey Fivenson, owner of Fivenson Food Equipment, was one of the pioneers of Northern Michigan business-to-business (B2B) television advertising. As an on-air personality, Mickey sold food equipment to restaurants, bars, hotels, schools, hospitals and nursing homes throughout Northern Michigan. Mickey became a household word with his unique TV spots. You never knew what you’d see next; Mickey as a long-distance runner, Mickey popping out of a food mixer or out of a steamtable, Mickey pounding a nail with a cup, or Mickey playing blues harmonica. It did not matter if you were in the food business or not, you knew Mickey.

His spots played at any time of the day, on soap operas, during the evening news, in the World Series, you never knew when you would see a Mickey Fivenson commercial. And you were entertained by the clever ads. The phrase, delivered by the Sven, the Swedish Chef, “Thank you, Mickey” became Mickey’s trademark. His TV spots covered the entire Northern half of the lower peninsula of Michigan and much of the UP. The ads were written, produced, engineered and written by Ron Lundmark, who appears on screen with Mickey as the Swedish Chef.

Mickey’s ads were featured on a national training video for the Television Broadcasters of America because of his unique B2B approach. Due to the nature of the media, most viewers were home owners, but if you needed food equipment and you were watching TV, you thought of Mickey. The ads were often co-sponsored by major food equipment manufacturers.

Mickey is unique in the food service arena. Mickey became a mentor to other businesses considering B2B TV marketing. Today, you won’t see Mickey’s spots on TV, but folks seem to have never forget “Thank you, Mickey”. I know, because to this day, 25 years after my last spot on TV, seldom does a week goes by that I do not hear the phrase, “Thank you, Mickey”.

Here’s a sample, more coming soon!

 

Advertisements

National Cherry Festival Meijer Festival of Races, July 7, 2018

The National Cherry Festival Meijer Festival of Races, 5K, 10K, 15K and Half Marathon was held July 7, 2018. Race director, Katherine Brege, welcomed about 3,000 runners to the races. Over 2,000 signed up for the 5K! Results can be found at this link; Meijer NCF Race results  .The races started on the Northwestern Michigan Campus and finished downtown at Front Street and Union Street. Runners experienced finishing the last three blocks of their race in front of the crowd waiting for the Grand Festival Parade. Runners enjoyed the picturesque views of Grand Traverse Bay. Runners came to the final stretch downtown and were re-energized by thousands of cheering fans all the way to the finish line.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Sponsored by Meijer Stores, the race was also sponsored by Cherry Bay Orchards. Denis Bouchard, from Cherry Bay Orchards passed out samples of dried cherrys and cherry drinks. Denis was assisted by Joe, Kristen and Stephanie. Chateau Grand Traverse, was a sponsor. They provided a free glass of wine to runners of proper age. Priority Health, Up North Live, Radio Z-93, and the Traverse City Record Eagle were important sponsors. At the finish, runners were treated to fresh cherries, cherry drink and GoGo Squeeze, all natural applesauce in various fruit flavors in an individual dispenser. GoGo Applesauce was created by a former NMC student.

Let’s get right to the “winners”. These competitors may not have been the fastest runners, but they typify the values of running, the important way running has changed their lives.

My first place “winner” is Peter Baty, 50, of Burlingame, California. Peter ran the 10K. He did not win a medal, but Peter typifies the importance of running. Peter runs for physical and mental health. Peter is also the son of my best buddy growing up in Traverse City. Peter’s dad, Donnie, was my “best buddy” until we were about 10 years old and he moved to Hastings. We celebrated ouf birthdays together as toddlers. I has not seen Donnie in over 60 years. What a shock to meet and interview Donnie’s son. Donnie went on the play football for the University of Michigan, GO BLUE. Peter’s mom, is the former Lou Ellen Benson who was a National Cherry Queen. Lou Ellen graduated a year behind me at Central High. I and my sons, Zack, from Vancouver, and Adam, from Washington D.C. who ran with me in the 10K. We encountered Peter several times during the event. Peter was accompanied by his friend, Jacob Schaaf, 37, of San Francisco, California. Jacob runs for cycling conditioning and because running is fun as a team building event.

My next “winner” is Kelly France, 38. Kelly moved to Traverse City from Muskegon one year ago. Welcome to Traverse City, Kelly. Kelly works in the mental health field as a counselor and therapist. She works in substance abuse online for a health care organization in Muskegon and travels monthly to Muskegon. Kelly recommends running and other physical exercise for all her clients for self-care and for better mental health. Kelly says; “Physical health and well-being is critical for a healthy brain and mind”. Wise words to heed. And the “winner” keep coming. Another “winner” is Bill Ruesink, 74, of Williamsburg and Springfield, IL. Bill is 6” tall and weighs 151 pounds, the same weight as in high school. Bill ran a great race, last year. In June of 2017, Bill received a pacemaker due to a heart blockage and a heartbeat that was missing for up to 15 seconds at a time. With no family history of heart conditions, Bill’s heart was failing. As a trained endurance athlete, Bill’s resting pulse had been a healthy 45. Bill received a pacemaker because his pulse dropped dangerously low and he had blockages. The doctors set his new heart beat to 60. 60 was too high for a trained athlete. Bill became dizzy. The doctors lowered the pacemaker heart beat to 50. Bill feels much better with a pulse of 50. Bill plans to continue running like he did today in the 5K. We were happy to see Roger Mulder, 78, from Holland, who I interviewed at length last year’s race. Roger had not seen last year’s article. My son, who is a technical computer whiz, found the article on his phone, showed the article to Roger and emailed him the link. Thanks, Adam!

Gary Lake, 72, of Honor, was a volunteer handing out ½ marathon shirts. He is the famous Bayer Aspirin Marathon Man. Gary survived a heart attack and continued running marathons because he took Bayer Aspirin. Gary was featured on a national TV spot for Bayer promoting the importance of Bayer Aspirin. Gary has completed 51 marathons including several Boston’s. He was entered in the Boston Marathon two years ago during the infamous bombing. Gary tells the story of how he reached mile 25, when race officials directed runners off the course telling all participants there had been an “incident” near the finish line, so he could not complete the marathon. Only later did Gary learn about the bombing. He was lucky to not have been personally involved in the tragedy. For several years, Gary was in charge of water stations and water station volunteers for the Detroit Free Press Marathon. Gary was responsible for over 550 volunteers. Gary wrote a multi-page water station manual which is still used by the Free Press Marathon. The manual is used here in Traverse City at the Meijer Festival of Races. The water stations at this race are excellent, I can personally attest. There were many volunteers and the cups were large enough to get a good drink. Thank you, Bayer Aspirin Marathon man!

Bill Neason, 71, of TC, ran the ½ marathon. Bill is a 1965 graduate of Central High School. Bill runs for overall health. Bill’s advice; “Keep moving or lose it”. Matt Peppes, 34, from Kansas City, is the owner of a digital marketing firm. He runs for stress release. Owning a digital marketing firm can be the source of plenty of stress. Lauren Nugent, 33, from Kansas City, runs for better health. Jim Monroe, 70, of TC, has run since high school. He runs 3 times per week to stay in shape for cross country skiing. Jim runs with the Traverse City Track Club in their weekly runs regardless of the weather. Linda Ramsey, 56, from Benzonia, runs to stay fit and meet people. Tim Asper, a “miracle man” for surviving a near fatal motorcycle accident, completed the race smiling. We would be remiss if we did not mention one of the favorite entries in the 5K, Grant Forrester and his team of happy helpers. Grant, though partially paralyzed, completed the 5K race.

Volunteers were crucial to the success of event. In addition to the many course marshals and water station workers, Nicole Wagner and Heather Feriend worked the registration tables as a mother-daughter team.  Sue Leach worked at registration as did Leonard Chown and Nichole Irish. Thank you to all volunteers.

Race director, Katherine Brege, hope you will enter next year’s National Cherry Festival Meijer Festival of Races, 5K, 10K, 15K and Half Marathon. You will feel better for the effort. If you can’t join them for this race, you can enter the Leapin’ Leprechaun Race held in March. Remember to ask your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.  

Goodwill Industries of Northern Michigan 5K Run for Shelter, June 23, Willow Hill School, Traverse City

Goodwill Industries of Northern Michigan 5K Run for Shelter, was held Saturday, June 23, at Willow Hill School, Traverse City. Fund Development Specialist and Race director, Stephanie Rustem, reports 171runners, walkers, babies and innumerable pets registered for the annual race. The registration fee supports one night of shelter for a neighbor in need, which includes two meals, basic necessities and resources to secure jobs and permanent housing. Participants received a Run for Shelter t-shirt, immediate race results and snacks following the completion of the run. Participants also walked away with the pleasure of supporting a good cause and knowing they made a difference in the lives of our neighbors experiencing homelessness. The race was run on a course through lovely neighborhoods, along West Bay, and through the flatlands of Hickory Hills finishing at Willow Hill School. Race results can be found at this link;    Goodwill 5K Results .   In addition to the well-known Goodwill area stores, the organization provides needed housing, merchandise, job help, and social support to Northern Michigan clients.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Goodwill deeply appreciates the following sponsors; Presenting Sponsor, American Proficiency Institute. Platinum Sponsor, Bill Marsh Group. Silver Sponsors, Alfie Logo Gear, Family Fare Markets, Yen Yoga & Fitness. In Kind Sponsor, Oryana. Media Sponsors; Record Eagle, Fox 32, 9 & 10 News. With the help of these important sponsors, the race was a critically needed success for Goodwill of Northern Michigan.

Let’s get right to my winner. He was not the fastest runner, but Dave Schupbach, age 77, of Jackson, is an excellent example of the benefits to aging runners,,,,,,,, such as me. Dave was running in his 900th race including 160 triathlons. At one time, Dave was ranked 6th in the nation in his age group. Most important, Dave has beaten genetics. Dave’s dad had bypass surgery in 1963 at age 60. He passed away at age 74. Dave is in excellent health. He has no illnesses. His blood pressure has dropped from 160 to about 110. He lost 20 pounds. He weighs less now than he did in high school. It was a pleasure for me to run some of the early parts of this race with Dave, until he took off on me. Congratulations to my race winner, Dave Schupbach. Dave, you are a winner in the game we call “Life” and an example to everyone.

Bill Marsh Jr, 57, ran the 5K. Bill and his brother, Jamie, sponsored the race because “Goodwill fulfills a vital role in meeting homeless needs beginning with shelter.” Bill has been an enthusiastic runner for many years. “Running has been part of my lifestyle,” Bill adds. Bill and Jamie took a high position in their age group. Thanks to Bill Marsh Jr, and all the sponsors. Jen Casey, 40, of TC, is director of the 9-11 Honor 5K Run, held Saturday, Sept 15, at F & M Park, in Traverse City. Jen ran with Branden, 1½ years old and Harper, 6½  months in a unique racing stroller for two children. Jen runs “to be a good example for her kids”. Anne Stanton, 60, of TC, runs for bone health, to be outside, and to be among friends. Homer Nye, 73, of TC, walked the course with his wife, Becky Mang. Homer says, “We have to work with the homeless.” Homer adds, “Walking has helped me age with more grace by keeping me fit, lowering my cholesterol, but most of all, it’s fun.” Becky adds, “The event helps raise funds for the homeless.  And walking is very beneficial for moving into the next stage of life.” Jessie Hernden, 30, from TC, runs to explore the city and to exercise her pet dogs. Jeff Houser, 33, of TC is a member of the Traverse City Track Club and proudly wears a TCTC team shirt. Jeff won overall second place, today. He runs so he can eat anything and drink anything.

The race would not be successful for the many Goodwill representatives present at the event and welcoming all participants. Sue Vado is Goodwill Volunteer Manager and Manager of Workers-On-Wheels. Sue has been a Goodwill manager over two years. Sue seemed to be everywhere, making participants feel welcome and comfortable. Sarah Dell’Acqua Kime, is Director of Advancement. Sue’s dad, Dick and I were runners together in the “early days” of running. Dick used to beat me hands down in races. He was FAST. Today, Dick has experienced back surgeries and has stenosis and cannot run. So I finally beat you, eh, Dick? Seriously, I hope for your full recovery so you can beat me again. Ryan Hannon is the Street Outreach Coordinator. Ryan works with homeless youth. He brings resources directly to the location of the client. Robert Randall, 53, of TC, ran the 5K and is Director of Donated Goods. He oversees the Northern Michigan stores. Running helps him control his weight and retain his fitness level. And there were important volunteers. Without them, the race could not happen. Volunteers were in charge of registration and were critical course marshals.

Race Director, Stephanie Rustem, and the many Goodwill employees and volunteers, want to see you at next year’s event. You will feel better for your effort because you will be supporting an important local organization with a great cause and you will be supporting your own fitness. Talk to your doctor before starting a fitness program. See you next year at the race.

FivensonYour author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba Diver and credits his running fitness and his scuba skills with surviving a fall through the middle of West Bay ice in over 600’ of water,,,,,, and saving his dog! He and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished fourth in his age group.  

North Mitten 5K, 10K and ½ Marathon, Crystal Mountain, May 27, 2018

Race director, Janice Davidson, and Crystal Mountain’s amazing PR director, Brian Lawson, who announced the awards, welcomed 391 runners and walkers to the 5th annual North Mitten 5K, 10K and ½ Marathon, Crystal Mountain, May 27. Race results can be found at this link; North Mitten Results . Runners kicked off Summer with a running start at Crystal Mountain’s 5th Annual Half Marathon, 10k, and 5k race! The North Mitten Half Marathon, 10k and 5k is a combination of paved roads, dirt roads and trails. The North Mitten routes consist of primarily flat, open trails on Crystal Mountain property and did not climb the mountain. Races started and finished at the white slopeside tent near the Crystal Clipper chairlift. This was a great spring race for beginners and experienced runners! Top three racers in each category won a prize pack.  An award ceremony was held at the Start/Finish Tent at 10:30am. Race results were posted and updated at the Start/Finish Tent. Participants received free admission to Micros at MountainTop. Plus all entrants were entered to win prizes including a resort stay. Volunteers were used for aid stations, course marshal, registration, start/finish line and course sweeps. All volunteers and runners received a tee shirt and one beverage at Micros at MountainTop.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Who was a “winner”? They were not the fastest runners, but Rod and Barbara Michaelson, 70, from Traverse City, were the runners who exemplified why exercise is important to good health. Ron runs and works out so he can “Stay off the couch”. Exercise works. Barbara has an even more critical reason for her exercise. Barbara suffers from rheumatoid arthritis. Exercise keeps her joints flexible and loose and exercise helps relieve pain. Exercise has helped Barbara reduce her medication and gives the Michaelson’s an excuse to spent valuable time together as a family event. The Michaelson’s also work out at a local gym and were wearing matching tee shirts advertising the gym. Congratulations to my “winners”, Rod and Barbara Michaelson. May you continue to enjoy exercise and the positive benefits?

Another “winner” was Jill Murphy, 49, from TC. I ran with Jill starting around mile five when she graciously offered me water. This race was Jill’s first 10K. Jill was running in honor of her son, Seth Beaudry, age 19. Several months ago, Seth was in a serious car accident and became paralyzed from the waist down. He avoided serious upper body injuries because at the last moment, he turned his head away from the impact. Seth is taking rehab, and hopes to walk again, but the road to walking is far away and fraught with many perils. Jill says; “Thanks to God that Seth is alive.” Seth was a runner. He hopes to eventually regain his running skills. Jill, congratulations. You “won” your first 10K. How many of you can say you won your first race?

We met more “winners”. It is amazing how exercise has changed their lives. John Germaine, 59, from Northville, ran the 10K. John runs to stay healthy. His father and grandfather were both sedentary and died from heart conditions. John’s resting heart rate is down 16 beats. John also runs with his wife and daughters.  Wife, Darlene, 60, (running helps her tennis) and sister, Cindy Rebman, (a lawyer in insurance defense) run for their brother, Carl Rebman, a disabled vet, who can’t run.  Daughter, Germain, 27 and her fiancé, Tyler Allen, 26, joined the family event.

Becky Young, 66, from Hastings, is a 3x marathoner with a 4;04 PR at the Chicago Marathon. What is amazing about Becky is that she is running on a replaced knee, with Doctor’s permission. Becky has lower pulse and enjoys running with her dogs. She stayed at Crystal Mountain, proving the economic benefit of races. Becky’s sister, Judy Young, 64, of San Carlos, CA, says running helps her avoid weight gain, and keeps her and her sister looking young. I agree!!!!

Our favorite University of Michigan runner was Bill Donoghue, 44, from Chicago. Bill sported a UM shirt that screamed GO BLUE and a low pulse of 42! Bill’s undergrad degree is from, where else, UM, and his law degree is from Georgetown, where my son, Adam received his master’s degree in foreign affairs. Bill was accompanied by the Donoghue clan, Ruth, 10, Charlie, 12 and Clark, 8. Did I say, GO BLUE? Vince Holmes, 56, from Davison, runs for stress release. Jeffery Hirsh, 42, is from TC and runs because he loves it. Bill Marshall, 78, from Benzonia, beat me like a drum in our age group for the 10K. But it should be no surprise he beat me.  Bill is a national champion tri-athlete, and still holds the Benzie school 440 record. He was a world champion at the young age of 71! Eric Buth, 55, of Ada, ran the ½ Marathon. Eric runs for mental health and for fitness. Eric should know what is good for him. He is an oncologist, and takes no stress meds. Running is his cure. Stacy Farmer, 46, from Frankfort, suffers from scoliosis in her back. Running relieves her pain. Stacy has run marathons. Stacy was running for her friend, Shelly Waldred, 48, who missed the race because she was flying in too late, from Spain. Sounds like a good excuse. Katherine Seekamp, 23, from Interlochen, coached West Middle School XC team. Katherine’s brother, Jimmy, graduated from UM with a degree in nuclear engineering. He will be earning his grad degree as a medical assistant. Dorothy Jaquish, 38, of Interlochen, lost 45 pounds and is losing even more. Dorothy plans to run a 5K every month. Kathleen Piatt, 66, from Montecillo, IL, was on her county board. Kathleen runs because it “keeps me trim”. She coached XC at middle school and started “Girls on the Run” in her community.

Janice Davidson and Brian Lawson invite you to Crystal Mountain next year for the North Mitten Races. You will enjoy a pristine course through the woods and maybe you will win a kayak, but you will be a “winner” for trying. Remember to ask your doctor before starting any exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 marathon PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba diver and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.

Mesick Mushroom Festival 5K Race/2K Walk May 12, 2018

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Race director, Rhonda Workman, Welcomed runners and walkers to the annual Mesick Mushroom Festival 5K Race/2K Walk, May 12, 2018. Rhonda is not sure how old the race is, other than the race is very old. This year is the third year Rhonda has directed the race. The run might be one of the most beautiful race courses in Northern Michigan as we wound along the rustic Manistee River backwaters, along primitive wooded trails to finish at the backwaters of the Hodenpyle Dam. The setting was an incredibly beautiful course. Lovely four colored medals were awarded the top three men and women, in 10 year age groups. Rhonda took photos of us all for her Facebook page. We were treated to homemade cookies and a fun drawing where additional gifts were provided by sponsors.

The race benefits the Mesick Track Team. Many Mesick track team members were present to help marshal the wooded course and to energetically ring cowbells. (Runners always have a need for more cowbell!!). Sponsors of the race were; Northern Exposures Campground, Mesick Market, Dynamic Physical Therapy, Ellen’s Corner, Mesick Dental Center, Antioch Hills, Northern Pines Health Center, Hilltop Truck Maintenance, Honor Bank, Munson Medical Center and Gaylord Outdoors. The race was further assisted by; Northern Lights Insurance, Finishing by Flatman, Mesick Women’s Club, Harmony Honey Farm, Wilderness Canoe Trips, The Workman Farm, and Evelyn Jakubik.

I met the race “winner” long after the medals were handed out and all prizes were awarded and the crowd was leaving. I saw a couple of runners watching the beautiful view. His “M” hat was intriguing. They looked like “normally” fit runners, but I was in for a surprise. It took several questions and comments before I found out Ann Baca, 57, of South Lyon, wore a pacemaker. Ann says “Running makes my heart stronger.” In 2012, Ann received an implanted cardio defribulator. Ann has Hypertrophic Cardo Myopathy. Her ventricular fribulation or PVC is resolved with the implant and through exercise. Ann also bikes, swims, does elliptical, and performs yoga. With a Prediaketic diet, she lost 35 pounds. Her A1C dropped from 6.2 to 5.9. Because Ann is pre-diabetic, she has been on a diabetic diet eating no more than 45-60 carbs per meal. Her cholesterol is better than ever. As a project manager, Ann also uses exercise as a stress relief. Congratulations to my “winner”, Ann Baca. You weren’t the fastest runner, but you proved that exercise will benefit even a serious condition. Ann’s husband, John Baca, also 57, “accompanied” my “winner”. John wore his U of M hat proudly. John attended UM Dearborn and is a crazy UM fan, like me. One son attended UM Dearborn, one son attended UM, Ann Arbor, and two daughters went to CMU and MSU! Ann, is this your first time as a race “winner”? You make us all very proud.

I had the pleasure of meeting the women members of a book club who ran in matching book club shirts and really did read books. These ladies were having a typical book club blast. All of them are from the Cadillac-McBain area and most are either teachers or health-care workers. Alexandre Dodde, age 30, lost 70 pounds including losing 30 inches in total. Carla Brummer, is 33, Erin Koetje is 36, and lost 30 pounds, Samantha Dekan is 30, Gabrielle Koetje, is 22, Emily Roeifsema is 30, her sister, Kathy Deller, is 33, lost 50 pounds, and reduced her blood pressure from 180/100 to 110/60. These ladies read good books and they are tough on the race course. Emily gave me a good tussle throughout much of the race.

I lost my age group “win” to Gerald Rohn, 72, from Freeland. What is most interesting about Gerald winning, is that he competed te 5K race with two replaced knees,,, and still beat me. Next year, Gerald, you are going down!! Pam Tank, 58, of Mesick, ran for her company, who is a sponsor, Northern Lights Insurance. Pam’s husband, Tim, 59, walked the course wearing a leg brace that stretched from his thigh to mid-calf. The brace helped keep bone from rubbing on bone where cartilage is missing. Stu Davidson, 29, of Midland, ran part of the course with me. Stu was a runner on his high school track team. Stu’s mother’s day gift to his mom was entry into this race. Mom, Mercedes Davidson, 57, meets with her son, Stu, for a Mother’s Day race every year for the last 14 years. Give mom the gift of life!! Helena Risdon, 67 of Alto, MI, near Grand Rapids, has been fast walking for the last 12 years. Helena walked with her daughter, Rosalyn Risdon, 43, from Byron Center. Rosylyn, runs to support causes such as the Susan G. Komen fund in the Gazelle Race. Amanda Kubiak, 29, walked the race with her 3 year old Husky, Meiko. Beautiful dog!! Cory Grimes, from Cadillac, is another “winner”. Cory lost over 200 pounds and lifts weights for a Cadillac area team. Cory continues to lose inches around his middle and keeps the same weight while adding muscle. Jody Baxter, 57, walked the course in spite of having a broken knee suffered in a fall.

The Mesick Track Team was present to marshal us around the wooded, winding trail. Each of the track team members rang cowbells to lighten our spirits as we ran the race. Next year, MORE COWBELLs, please. We need more cowbells!! Micah Vogler, Elizabeth Terry, Austin Liebzeit, Tenzin McGregor, Maddy Weinert, Jorge Lewis, Aiden Brewer, Courtnie Gibbs, Joey Stewert, Alyia Caranhan, Abby Riffle, Jack Malkowski, Frankie Simerson, and Grant Fleis all members of the track team, participated. We could not have finished this race without your help. Coach, Rob McGregor, was in charge of team members.

Race director, Rhonda Workman, hopes you will join her for next year’s Mesick Mushroom Festival 5K and fun run along the beautiful Manistee River. Always ask your doctor before starting an exercise program.  Rhonda, thank you for bringing us this race, having an important impact on many lives. Rhonda is a veteran. Thank you, Rhonda, for your service and for directing this exceptional event!!!

 

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, of Traverse City, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons (3:01 marathon PR) and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba diver and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished second in his age group.

Kalkaska Rotary Wood Memorial 5K & 10K Run, April 28, VFW Hall

According to race director, Dr. Clayton Skrzypczak, this race is the 27th annual Kalkaska Rotary Wood Memorial Run, formally known as the Trout Run. I recall running in the “Trout Run” about 25 years ago when it was one of the few 10K races held in Northern Michigan. Running along the many lakes and streams surrounding Kalkaska, the race is quite scenic and lovely.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

This run is held in the memory of Kalkaska’s own Chad Wood and his father, Stafford, who loved cross country running and track. Chad died of leukemia in 1990, during his senior year of high school. His father, Stafford, who filled many rolls throughout the years at Kalkaska High School, died six years later.

The Kalkaska Rotary uses the funds raised through both participation and the generous sponsorships of local business, to help raise money to support four different youth scholarships, Youth Exchange, the Senior Party for the graduating seniors of Kalkaska High School, as well as many other improvement projects at the school and the community. The Kalkaska Rotary hopes to grow this event to add more funding to these wonderful programs!

Race sponsors include; Kalkaska Memorial Health Center (partnering with Munson Healthcare), American Waste, Northern Seal Inc, Kalkaska Funeral home and Cremation Services, Kalkaska Family Vision Care, Great Lakes Golf Carts, and the Rotary Club of Kalkaska. In addition to sponsoring the event, as you will see from reading this article, Rotary Club members were volunteering at many sites before, during and after the event. Race results can be found at this link; Wood Memorial Run .

While this race earns important funds for the good works of the Kalkaska Rotary Club, the run also impacts many lives in an important manner. Let’s meet some of the amazing runners and walkers who have positively impacted their lives through exercise and running. As author of this article, I have the privilege of picking my own race “winners”. These folks may not be the fastest runners, but they all impacted their lives in a positive, important manner. For the Wood Memorial Run, the “winners” circle is filled by two runners. First is “winner” Mary Swift, 62, of Traverse City. Mary’s back went out on her 4 years ago. She has a severely bulging disc and was bed-ridden for a long period of time. Today, Mary no longer takes medications for her back. She “walks” briskly. When I saw Mary in the out-and-back portion of the race, she was moving at a pretty fast pace that looked like running to me. Mary either walks briskly for her daily exercise or she swims including running in the pool and step aerobics. Mary even rollerblades in her neighborhood. This year she downhill skied at one of our many fine resorts. Mary says; “Motion is Lotion. If you keep moving, you will regain much of the life you may have lost. If you do not move, you lose all chance of rehabilitation”. Wise words, Mary. By the way, Mary won her age group on the 5K. Way to go, Mary. For hubby, Bill, 75, this event was his 1072 race! Bill was also an age group winner.

My next “winner” is Dave Maddox, 64, from Gaylord. Dave has completed 20 marathons and run at least one 100 mile Gaylord to Mackinaw race. Both feats are proudly marked with tattoos on Dave’s arms, one tattoo on the right arm, one tattoo on the left arm. Dave has also completed over 150-½ marathons. What is so impressive about Dave is that forty years ago, he almost died from smoking and drinking. Dave’s liver was shot. His doctor told him he must turn his life around or face serious consequences. Dave lost 150#! Yes, in addition to being a “winner”, Dave is also this races “big loser”. Congratulations to Dave. Dave was the “Health Ambassador” of Northern Michigan for former governor, Jennifer Granholm. Dave expects to run the four day race in Pinckney. He trains 6-10 miles each day.

More amazing runners to follow; Bruce McHenry, 77, of Grave Harbor, near Cheboygan, lost 90# and improved his blood measurements to where his doctor says he is doing fine with all his critical blood work. Jessica Stark, 34, from Kingsley, ran a 5K, after delivering a healthy daughter several months ago. Son, Eric, 7, ran the 10K while dad, Chris, took daughter, Alli, 5, in the fun run. Chris is among the fastest of area runners, but today he had “fun run duty”. Nick Amato, 21, of Suttons Bay, and Ann Arbor, won the 5K. Nick is on the triathlon team as a senior at the University of Michigan, GO BLUE!! He is majoring in public health with a minor in entrepreneurial studies. Did I say,,,,,,,,,,,,, GO BLUE!!!?

The race could not have occurred without the help of volunteers, many of whom were affiliated with The Kalkaska Rotary Club. In addition to running in the 5K, Colette Pierce, 58, ran in the 5K. Colette is the Kalkaska Rotary Club Secretary and helped with registration. Mel Cook, was everywhere. Mel is the incoming Rotary President. Tom Tanner is the past president of the Rotary. Kevin Rogols, ran the race and is the current Kalkaska Rotary Club President. Caleb Paryani, handed out water on the course, rang cow bells, cheered on runners, and helped set-up.

We were happy to see one of the parade floats, and an important float. We saw the final assembly of the Veterans Float by Dave and Melanie Pauch. The float was in support and carrying veterans and members of VFW Post 8684 along with American Legion Post 480 Color Guard. Thank you for your service.
Race director, Clayton Skrzypczak, and The Kalkaska Rotary Club, hopes you will join them for next year’s beautiful and scenic race and help continue the memory of the Wood Family. Remember, always ask your doctor for permission before starting an exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76 (Happy Birthday, today, to me), of TC, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba diver and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey finished fourth in his age group and for the first time in his life, was accompanied by the sheriff pace car, or was it the sweep car?

Big Little Hero Run. NMC Main Campus, Apr 21, 2018

Race director, Kyle Brownley, welcomed 190 runners and walkers and dogs to the   fourth annual Big Little Hero Run, NMC Main Campus, Apr 21. Benefiting Big Brothers, Big Sisters, the event was a superhero themed race. Runners came wearing their favorite superhero costumes. The fun run was free and there were prizes for all children who participated. NMC’s College for Kids sponsored the fun run so that every child that participated received a cape!  After the event, everyone went downstairs for the awards ceremony, food, prizes and fun events for kids of all ages. All runners could enjoy face painting, balloon animals and more! There were awards for top overall male/female finisher in both the 5K & 10K, best costume; male & female, child & group, and three deep medals in each age group. The course ran around the NMC campus, out the beautiful Old Mission peninsula and back. All proceeds from this event will benefit the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBG) of Northwestern Michigan who according to executive director Cecilia Chesney, are urgently seeking more “Bigs” to join a waiting list of over 100 “Littles” waiting for partners. BBBG services nearby counties around Grand Traverse and are always in need of volunteers and sponsors. The popular event was conducted by NMC Business Students for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The race was proudly supported by the following sponsors, Pickle Print Marketing, Hogarth’s Pest Control, Northwestern Michigan College, Stromberg and The Delora A. Norris Foundation. More supporters include; Infinity Screen Printing, Cherry Lane Electric, Bogard & Sons Construction, City of Traverse City, Eventsnorth, Utility Supply and Construction, Safety Net, KSP Machining, Marathon Automotive, Sports Clips Haircuts, Alfie Logo Gear, Priority Health, Comfort Keepers, Wolverine Power Cooperative, Wilson and Kester Divorce and Family Law, Community Foundation, 4Front Credit Union, Shorts Brewery, Fit 4  Mom, TBA Credit union, Grand Traverse Resorts, Prout Financial Design, and Chemical Bank.

My “winner” was an old friend from 40 years ago or so. I did not recognize Shelley Wilson Kester, because Shelley had lost 100#. Shelley has fought weight all her life. She gave up alcohol and sugar and she looks great. Why did she work so hard in becoming in shape? So she could “love herself”. Shelley has also defeated asthma. She no longer takes asthma medication. Also, she has eliminated her allergy medication, she sleeps better and “shopping is more fun”. Congratulations to my “winner”, Shelley Wilson Kester. Shelley’s hubby, Paul, is no slouch either. Paul has dropped 20# by eating more fish and veggies.  And, they are also race sponsors!!!  Proud dad and granddad, Pat Wilson, looked on……… LOOKED ON?????

Stephen McDonald, 46, and his daughter, Sophia, 10, Ian, 8, and Finnish exchange student, Veikkg Lipsenen are from Elk Rapids. Stephen is not your average runner. He has type 1 diabetes and wears an insulin pump to control the diabetes. Stephen says, “The pump plus exercise help to bring down my medication needs”. Irma Brownley, 52, of TC, Race Director Kyle Brownley’s mother, runs for fitness and fun. She has been a long time runner but running was interrupted because of two bouts with breast cancer. Irma is in remission. You are a brave lady, Irma. Dani Mullen, is the girlfriend of race director. Dani’s mother, Linda, walked the race. Linda has lost 80 points from her cholesterol count. Amazing feat, Linda. Tim Nelson, the president of NMC, walked the course. Tim enters the race every year. Tim exercises regularly. He has experienced artificial hips and back surgery and still he prevails. Exercise helps Tim to increase his energy. We can all learn from Tim. Ryan Notebart, 43, dressed as Mario, walked the course to support BBBG. Mike Brown, 27, is a personal trainer at the Lighthouse Rehab Center. And “Superman”, was at the race. Aaron, 39, from Kingsley, gets strength from running and has decreased his meds. Aubrey Honeycutt, 30, of TC, is training for a marathon. Aubrey lost 20#. Today, she pushed daughter, Emma, 4, in a racing stroller. Hubby, Garry, 32, lost 30#. The Honeycutts narrowly beat me across the finish line ,,,, pushing a cart!!! . Brian Lriesel, 38, of TC, wore his U of M shirt, proudly. Brian is a software developer and 2003 graduate of my alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN! GO BLUE! And talk about my favorite U of M decked super hero, Bill Swift, 75, of TC wore his favorite UM outfit and completed race number 1071! Way to go, Bill.

We were joined by royalty. Clare Klien, 18,  is Miss Elk Rapids, Jenna Wolfe 16, is Miss Teen Elk Rapids, Lindsley Hayes, 12 is Miss Preteen ER, and Emma Eardley, 8, is Young Miss ER. They were joined by their chaperone, Donna Sayler. My favorite running queen, National Cherry Festival Queen, Ashley Schichtel helped pass out the awards.

The event would not have been successful without volunteers. Officer Comiskey of the Traverse City Police department was on hand. Officer Comiskey and I ran together in an earlier race. Reserve Officer Silliman, Reserve officer, O’brien, Reserve officer Morgan, and Sheriff Borokavich from Leelanau County were assisting with the race. Grant Burfiend, is a student and was helping with race logistics. The volunteer team from Kolh’s was on hand to help marshal the course. Sara Cabinaw is also program administrator at BBBS, Denise Rushinowski, Sena Cook, Margaret Szajner, and Ellie Childs are all with Kohl’s Cares. The Michigan Stiltwalker, Neil Sauter, was on hand performing his amazing feats on stilts and tying balloons for the kids.

Race director, Kyle Brownley, invites you to participate in next year’s Big, Little Race at NMC. Wear your favorite superhero costume or come anyway. You will feel better for the effort. Remember, to always ask your doctor before starting any exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 75, of TC, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is an Advanced Scuba diver and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey won a medal for second place in his age group.

“Race to the Tomb” 5K New Hope Community Church, 4-7-18, Williamsburg

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Race director, Duane Amato, received almost 150 entries for the second annual “Race to the Tomb” 5K at the beautiful fields and orchards surounding the New Hope Community Church, a few miles north of the Grand Traverse Resort on US 31 in Williamsburg. Duane had expected more entries because the Traverse City Track Club had awarded the race the title of “Favorite New Race of 2017”, but due to the cold and ice conditions, entries were lower than expected. Proceeds from the event went to Habitat for Humanity. The Race to the Tomb is held on a beautiful course on paved roads, with a quick jaunt through orchards. At the finish, racers and walkers ended “at the tomb” which is located at the lovely New Hope Community Center, an ideal facility to start and finish a race. Awards were given to the top 3 overall male / female, top 1 masters (50-59) male / female, and top 1 grand masters (60+) male/female. The top 3 finishers (male and female) in each age group also received an award.  Race director, Duane Amato, who took home the grand master’s award, explained to me the reason for the name, “Race to the Tomb”. Church Pastors Craig Treirweiler and Rick Stewart wanted to do a 5K race around the Easter Holiday. They came up with the name “Race to the Tomb”. When Jesus was crucified, his body was placed in a tomb with a huge stone covering the entry. Three days later, the huge stone was discovered removed. When the apostles “raced to the tomb” they found his body gone thus proving his rise.

Special thanks are due to John Pulcifar for allowing the race to proceed through his lovely orchards. Also supporting the race were ­­Running Fit and Bigby Coffee. Results can be found at the following link; Race to the Tomb 2018 Results  . Then click on “All Genders” and “All Categories” to see five year age groups by gender.

Let’s move on to our “winner”. As writer of this article, I am “allowed” to pick my “winner”. My “winner” is not the fastest runner, but the runner who has changed his life most dramatically through running, the runner whose story is most impactful for others reading this article. Today we have two “winners”. Jeff Brown, 49, from Gladwin has been running 43 years. He started when he was 6 years old. Due to an injury, he developed a dangerous blood clot in his leg. Jeff was attempting to run a race in every county in Michigan (a feat he later accomplished). The fact that he was a conditioned runner was one reason he survived the clot and was able to return to running. Jeff recalls one of his more memorable races held at the Bronson Children’s Hospital in Kalamazoo. “Seeing all the ill children as they thanked us for attending the race, was heart-warming and inspirational. As an RN, I have used my experience with my own blood clot with many patients. I can see the value of good health and the dangers of bad health.”

My second “winner” is Tracey Weatherholt, 56, of Traverse City. Tracey says “I am diabetic. I have been running several years. Running helps me use less diabetes medication. I was using 40 units of pumped insulin per day. Now, I am down to 10 units and I assume that will drop even further because I have increased my training as I prepare for a half-marathon with the help of the Traverse City Track Club. I recently had a physical and my doctor says my cholesterol looks great”. Congrats to my two race “winners”. You are both a lesson to us all. Tracey’s friend, Jill Thompson, 36, of Cedar, relieves the stress of four kids by running. “Running is for me and me alone,” says Jill.

Erin Ferguson, 39, of TC, is leaving for Denmark to run a race. Erin is a member of Team USA, and will compete in a global triathlon competition. Erin started running and competing as an adult. She is a paramedic and can attest to the dangers of being out of condition. Randy Stone, 63, of TC, walked the course to support New Hope. His buddy, Steve Orum, 58, from Grand Haven, ran in high school and college. He interrupted his running for over 20 years, and now is back at it. Steve ran his only marathon in 2:58 at the New York Marathon. Steve does not let two knee surgeries slow him down. Steve says “his son is the real running star as he is a current college varsity runner”. Steve LaBonte, 57, of TC, started running with his dad. 15 triathlons and four years later, he is still at it. Mary Beth Sellers, 57, of TC, has been running 27 years. She runs to relieve anxiety. Richard Nicholas, 47, of TC, lost 37 pounds. Angela Clem-Skeans, 49, of TC is the daughter of Gary Clem, my brother, Tom’s, good Central High School buddy. She loves the feeling of staying healthy. Her mom was a race helper who recalls my brother visiting her in the hospital after a serious motorcycle accident during high school.

I was privileged to meet some leaders of the New Hope Church, all of whom are runners. Of course, I need to begin with the man who is an inspiration to us all, Pastor Tim Manzer. Tim suffered a life-threatening motorcycle accident, experienced many broken bones and severe depression. Tim has recovered his health and has become one of the area’s most respected runners and an important church leader. It is always an inspiration to talk with Tim. Pastor Rick Stewart, is a leading pastor of New Hope Church. Rick has been running since he was on the High School track team and two years in college. Rick trains weekly 2-3 times. Bob Felton, 50, is pastor at the New Hope Bellaire campus. Bob has an ambition to be a runner but says he “lacks discipline”. Hopefully, after this, his first 5K race, running will catch on with Bob.

Volunteers were important to the race. Barb Mosher, handed out the technical tee shirts. Many other Habitat for Humanity and New Hope volunteers marshalled the various twists and turns in the route.  Bradley Hahn, a new chiropractor in the TC area, helped on the Habitat for Humanity informational table and marshalled the course. Habitat for Humanity, and executive director, Wendy Irvin, explained to me that HFH covers three area counties. Their mission “Puts God’s love into action by bringing people together to build suitable homes, communities and hope”. HFH volunteers and sponsors are always needed.

Race director, Duane Amato, hopes you will join him for next year’s “Race to the Tomb”. You will enjoy one of the North’s nicest finish line, terrific awards, great snacks and a unique shirt. But remember, before starting an exercise program, consult your doctor.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 75, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. He is a rabbi, an Advanced Scuba diver and plays blues harmonica internationally and with area bands. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey took first place in his age group.

 

Leapin’ Leprechaun 5K, Warehouse District, Sat, March 17, 2018. By Mickey Fivenson

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Race director, Michelle Elliott, the National Cherry Festival and 5/3 Bank, welcomed over 1000 runners. The runners interviewed are not the fastest runners, but they are runners who have impacted their lives by running. Frankly, they looked just like most of the other runners at the finish, fit, trim, drinking beer and eating cookies. They looked quite “normal” until I learned their amazing story. The winners are Ken and Jennifer Goodhue, of Traverse City. Ken, 56, lost 100# and lost 8” off his waist. He experiences no more back or knee pain. Ken has kept the weight off for 2 years. Jennifer, 53, is running, with doctor’s permission, on a fully replaced knee. She could not run, before the surgery. “Now, I can run”, she says. She runs three days each week. Congratulations to Ken and Jennifer Goodhue who may not have won a speed medal, but they won the race to a better life.

A close second was Barb Meredith, 68, of TC. Barb lost 24#, but her amazing feat is dropping her cholesterol from 260 to 130. In the process, Barb lost 10” overall (legs, thighs, waist, etc.). Barb shared her incredible story with me; “I started going to the gym and had a trainer who had me run around the building. When I told her my weight was dropping, two years ago, she asked me if I had ever run a 5K. I said no. The trainer told me I was running one in a few days. And I did it and I have run four 5Ks since then“.  Apparently, Barb is bitten by the running, health bug the same as all of us. YOU GO, GIRL!!!  Trisha Strahan, 53, from TC, has a family history of heart attacks and high cholesterol. Trish is beating the odds by running. Holly Murphy, 30, from Grayling, is a real Irish Princes, and was dressed as such. Holly’s grandfather was an Irish tenor and he designated Holly as an authentic “Irish Princess”. Judy Goodland, 47, of TC, experienced a drastic drop in her Blood pressure down to 110/70 and heart beat dropped to 65. Husband, Dan, 48, saw his blood pressure drop from 180/90 to 135/70. He lost 20# and 3 inches. He runs about 3 miles, 4 x each week and enjoys a “brew without any guilt”. Jeremy Treadwell, 57, of TC, runs so he can live to 100! He runs 15-20 miles each week. These folks are all winners in the game of life.

Jessica Stark, 34, from Kingsley, director of the Kingsley Heritage 5K, after the Cherry Festival Race, ran her first 5K since delivering a happy 11# baby, Madilyn,  last June. Jessica was accompanied by son Eric, 7, and hubby, Chris. Zac Ligon, 45, from TC, ran High School track and currently runs 3-4 days each week. Karen Whitney, 53, from Lake City, has been running since seven years of age. Karen ran varsity cross country at Central Michigan University. Even though she had knee surgery, with doctor’s permission, she runs today, but mostly from hubby, Russell, 54, who says, with a smile, running helps with his sex drive. Maybe it’s not a joke.  Russell lost 12# and has much more stamina.  Laurie Kischnick, 54, from Marion, needed to get in shape. She lost 20# and trains 3 miles 4 times per week.  Jeff Durga, 51, from Cadillac, runs to have fun with friends.

I was privileged to spend time with royalty. National Cherry Festival Queen, Ashley Schichtel was running her first 5K. Queen Ashley works out every day with boxing, yoga, and running laps. Ashley is a student in the doctor of nursing program at Grand Valley State College. She had so much fun that she is planning to race more. Queen Ashley was accompanied by Queen’s Committee volunteer, Heidi Szeslong who is training for a ½ marathon. Heidi has been running 15 years and has lost 10#.

Kat Paye, Executive Director of the Cherry Festival ,was in attendance helping wherever she could especially on the start and finish, as was Anna O’Connor, intern for the Festival, who helped at registration and handing out nice tee shirts. Anna won the internship job over many applicants because her college, CMU, has participated for several years with the Festival. Alle Gruziano was an important volunteer handing out winner’s medals. Allison Goss won another Bigfoot! Kidding, Allison, who directs the Frozen Foot Race, already has 8 Bigfoot Race statues and a separate room for them! Today she won a medal. Easier to carry.

Race director, Michelle Elliott, and the National Cherry Festival, invite you to next year’s Leapin’ Leprechaun 5K. Wear your green. Get healthy! But before you do, join Michelle and me for the Meijer National Cherry Festival of Races Saturday, July 7. You will experience one of the finest races in Northern Michigan. But before you do, ask your doctor when starting an exercise program.

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, age 76, has lost over 100 pounds and trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com. Today, Mickey took second place.

Tony Anderson, Super Hero. Big Little Super Hero Race, Saturday, April 14, 2018. Fun Run: 9:00 a.m. 5K/10K: 9:30 a.m. NMC, West Hall. By Mickey Fivenson

Tony Anderson would be the first to tell you, he is no super hero. Super heroes are the many Big Brother, Big Sister adults with “Little brothers or Little Sisters”, adults devoting their time to helping kids. (And there is a huge waiting list of kids waiting for adults in our BBBS area.)  But Tony Anderson is a Super Hero, by any stretch of the imagination. During the day, Tony is General Manager of Cherryland Electric Co-op. During the evenings, Tony turns into a Super Hero. Tony has been on the board of Big Brothers, Big Sisters for over thirteen years. Tony has had his own “Little Brother”. Tony is also raising much needed funds for Big Brothers, Big Sisters by attempting to run a marathon in every state. To date, Tony has completed 39 marathons, that’s 39 races of 26.2 miles. His next race is ­­­­–March 18 in Hilo, Hawaii. To date, Tony has raised ­­over $300,000 for BBBS. What is even more remarkable, this huge accomplishment is being done with a hip replacement! Yes, Tony chose to continue his charitable feat with a new hip. Learn more about Tony’ challenge by visiting his website; www.marathon4kids.com

What makes Tony run? I asked Tony a few questions. Following are Tony’s answers:   Why do you serve on the BBBS board?  To have an impact on the lives of kids in our region. Have you had a Little brother or sister?  Yes. Describe the positives of having a “Little Brother”?  When an adult cares, listens and believes in a child, the child gains hope. Hope for a better tomorrow. Hope for a better future.  What should a person consider before taking on a Little brother or sister? Can they make a consistent commitment? It only has to be an hour a week or a couple hours per month, but it needs to be consistent. What message would you like to impart to others thinking about volunteering with BBBS? Together, we can change the world one child at a time. If you want less crime and violence in the world, it all starts at home with the care and treatment of our children.

Regarding his replaced hip, Tony responds as follows; When was your hip replaced?  March 4, 2016. Do you experience pain in your hip when you run after the surgery? The muscles are still weak and they do get swollen if I run too hard or too far. Most of the pain and discomfort comes after I stop running. Are your doctors aware you are running?  Yes. Is there a downside to running on a new hip? The downside is that you have to be comfortable with not running as fast as you once did. How many marathons have you completed?  39 marathons in 39 states. What is your marathon personal record? 3:47. When is your next marathon?  March 18, Hilo, Hawaii. What time do you hope to achieve in the next marathon?  4:50. How much training do you do per week? 25 – 40 miles – depends on where I am at in the latest training cycle. Are there other runners with replaced hips with whom you communicate.  yes. There is a blog at www.hiprunner.com . How much money have you raised for BBBS?  The grand total is over $300,000.   How many years have you been running marathons?  Since 2003. Your age?  55. Your height?  5’11”. Your weight?  Depends on the day. Does your weight vary?  Weight has been the same for the last few years. Tony added he can’t pass Potter’s without buying a donut. Talk about your kids? Zach is 31, from Cadillac, Andrew is 28, from Kingsley, and Collette, 22, is a law school student at Wayne State. They all run. What symptoms did you experience prior to hip surgery?  It felt like a muscle pull for over one and a half years. Will you be running the Big Little Hero Run? Yes, the 5KWhat is the date and time?  Saturday, April, 14, 2018 Fun Run: 9:00 a.m. and 5K/10K 9:30 a.m.  Location: NMC Main Campus – West Hall. Lots of prizes.

Tony at the marathon

Tony Anderson will tell you he’s no Super Hero. He is just like many other Big Brother, Big Sister volunteers. But Tony is so much more. Tony fits the mold of a Super Hero. Join Tony and me in the BBBS Super Hero Race, Saturday, April 14 at NMC. For more Super Hero race information or to register, go to; https://events.bytepro.net/biglittleherorace  . Remember to speak with your doctor before starting an exercise program.

 

Your author, Mickey Fivenson, has trained over 150,000 miles in 48 years of running. He has completed over 60 marathons and holds one marathon world record with his sons, Zack and Adam. Mickey is the former director of the National Cherry Festival Runs. Mickey’s doctors credit running toward surviving several strokes. If you’d like Mickey to cover your race, if you need tips on training, email mickey at telecomclassifiedads dot com.